American Apparel and Footwear Association

we wear intelligence

AAFA provides a clearing house of information for the U.S. apparel and footwear industry, as well as consumers.

in the spotlight

Check out AAFA's events across the topics of trade, intellectual property and brand protection, supply chain, and more. Events Calendar > 

legislative action

Now is the time to contact Congress to tell them why you oppose the Border Adjustment Tax. Click here to send an email to your elected representatives urging action on trade.

State-Specific Resources

 

Washington Children's Safe Products Act

The reporting rule for the Children’s Safe Product Act requires that companies disclose the presence of Chemicals of High Concern to Children (CHCC).  The purpose of this guidance is to provide the apparel and footwear industry with a common methodology to approach the reporting decision making process to ensure a degree of consistent reporting throughout the industry.

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Maine Toxic Chemicals in Children's Products Law

In April of 2008, Maine passed the Toxic Chemicals in Children’s Products law. The law was amended in June 2011. The law pertains only to consumer products, with a focus on products intended for, made for, or marketed for use by children under 12 years of age. The law was enacted to protect the health, safety, and welfare of Maine citizens, and to reduce exposure of children and other vulnerable populations to chemicals of high concern.

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California Green Chemistry

AAFA created a primer to help companies understand the California Safer Product Consumer Products Regulations, commonly known as California Green Chemistry Regulations, which went into effect on October 1, 2013.

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Vermont's Chemicals of High Concern for Children's Products

In June of 2014, Vermont passed Act 188, relating to the regulation of toxic substances. The law pertains only to consumer products, with a focus on products intended for, made for, or marketed for use by children under 12 years of age. The law was enacted to protect the health, safety, and welfare of Vermont citizens, and to reduce exposure of children and other vulnerable populations to chemicals of high concern. The law requires Vermont’s Department of health to maintain a list of Chemicals of High Concern in children’s products.  The law requires businesses selling covered consumer products (children’s products) in the State of Vermont to submit a notice if Chemicals of High Concern are used or present in the making of children’s products.

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